Business Marketing Tips

Ever watch Sesame Street?

Sure you have. It’s one of the most famous and long-running television shows for children. And while most business owners may dismiss this show as something light and fluffy for kids, don’t make this mistake because there are a ton of small business marketing lesson going on in every single episode.

Take Count Dracula for example.

Remember this character?

He’s the guy with the pointed nose that teaches kids how to count. And have you ever noticed how Count Dracula enters the room bouncing up and down like he’s walking on his toes? And that voice. Who can forget Count Dracula’s voice?

So anyway, I got to thinking about all the ways you can use Count Dracula to give your small business marketing a boost. And before you say this is silly, read this short article and see for yourself.

3 Small Business Marketing Tips By Count Dracula:

1. Successful marketing is all about your numbers.

Count Dracula’s specialty was teaching kids how to count. He did this by counting on his fingers, and by counting objects.

Small business marketing is all about counting numbers too. That’s all it boils down to… your numbers. Can Count Dracula add up all the money you made from your last campaign, or not? Did you add a hefty number of new customers to your business, or not?

So make sure you track your marketing so you know your numbers.

2. Add a big character to your marketing.

The cool thing about Count Dracula and all the other characters on Sesame Street is that they are unforgettable. This is done on purpose. For two reasons: First, the producers of Sesame Street want to give kids a reason to watch each show. And having strong (and memorable) characters does this. And second, strong characters help kids remember the lesson being taught. And that’s the #1 goal of Sesame Street.

Same goes for adding a strong (and fun) character to your marketing. It makes your marketing memorable. And it helps you get your message across.

3. Be somebody.

Notice how Count Dracula is somebody. He stands for something. He’s the guy who helps kids learn how to count. And as we were just saying in the last tip, for this reason, he is memorable.

What do you stand for?

Who are you?

If I asked three of your customers to answer those questions, what would they tell me? Make sure nobody says, “Oh he’s the guy who sells me lawn supplies (or whatever you do)” because this makes you a common commodity. And that’s not the place you want to be.

So there you have it.